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Science

Science Curriculum Statement

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

(National Curriculum 2014)

Science at St Augustine’s aims to teach our children the skills, knowledge and understanding they need to question and understand concepts and phenomena that occur in the world around them and equips them with the motivation to seek explanations for these.  Children learn the skills required for scientific enquiry and they will begin to appreciate the way science will affect their future on a personal, national and global level. The aims of science are to enable children to:

Ask and answer scientific questions 

Plan and carry out fair scientific investigations, using equipment including computers 

Know and understand the life processes of living things 

Know and understand the physical processes of materials, electricity, light, sound and natural forces 

Know about materials and their properties

Evaluate evidence and present their conclusions clearly and accurately

These are just a few examples of the fantastic Science going on in our classrooms.

 

Key Stage 1 Science

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1. 
(National Curriculum 2014)

Experiment day (FS2)

We started off with a floating and sinking experiment. We looked at a range of different objects and predicted whether they would float or sink. 

We then moved on to making broomsticks. We thought about the materials we could use and tested which one travelled the furthest and why. 

During the afternoon we carried out a range of different experiments such as: fireworks in a jar, making slime and volcanic explosion. I'm sure Igor will tell you all about these!

Children in Foundation Stage love to look after the different aspects of God’s World. They water the plants and talk about the different things that plants need to grow. 

They also look for rubbish around the environment and talk about the different materials and how they can damage the world. 

We have also talked about the lifecycle of a butterfly and watch the caterpillars transform into cocoons and then into beautiful butterflies!

Animals & Habitats (Year 2)

Sam Safari came into year 2 to talk about animals and their habitats from around the world. 

Livvy and Sachi holding a Stick insect.

Hazel holding a giant snail.

Mikayla and Shaun were introduced to a Giant African Tortoise.

Weather (Year 1)

This photo is year 1 observing the weather in relation to the current season. We went on a walk around the school grounds, feeling and listening to the wind and observing cloud formations and movement. Back in class we linked this to the current season while drawing and writing about weather in each of the 4 seasons. To support this, we watched clips of different weather patterns and shared experiences of different weathers eg building snow men, using sunscreen etc 

LO- observe and describe weather associated with the seasons 

The children made charts and observations regarding the local weather as well as watching clips of local weather forecasts. This appeared to capture their interest and they were keen to carry out their own forecasts- this was a great assessment tool as they were displaying all they knew on the subject as most included things like; what the current season was, day length  and typical weather patterns for the season. 

Lower Key stage 2- Years 3 & 4

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word reading and spelling knowledge. 
(National Curriculum 2014)

Animals including Humans (Year 3)

 Year 3 had a lot of fun and discussion during a sorting activity.  

Great vocabulary!

Forces and Magnets (Year 3)

A good time was had by all investigating different forces.  Great co-operation in the groups.

Upper Key Stage 2-Years 5 & 6

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings. ‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read, spell and pronounce scientific vocabulary correctly.
(National Curriculum 2014)